Teach your Lifers well? (This is NOT a parody!)

Feb 24th, 2014 | By | Category: Paco's Podium, Realignment, Rehabilitation, Spotlight
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Lifers to ride next wave of realignment?

“Due to the length of incarceration, long-term offenders are often not prepared for the significant changes in technology and day-to-day living that have occurred since they were first incarcerated,” said Millicent Tidwell, CDCR Division of Rehabilitative Programs Director. “Giving these offenders the tools they need to be successful in their own rehabilitation both inside and outside prison is imperative.”

“Long-term offenders are often not prepared for the significant changes in technology since they were first incarcerated,” said Millicent Tidwell, CDCR Division of Rehabilitative Programs Director. This guy has been in prison since 1971, but only recently got his first cellphone.

CDCR Launches New Rehabilitative Services for Long-Term Offenders

CDCR Today

SACRAMENTO—The California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR) is launching a pilot program offering targeted rehabilitative services to inmates serving long-term sentences.

The Long-Term Offender Pilot Program (LTOPP) provides evidence-based programming during incarceration and services upon release to allow inmates an easier transition back into society.

“Due to the length of incarceration, long-term offenders are often not prepared for the significant changes in technology and day-to-day living that have occurred since they were first incarcerated,” said Millicent Tidwell, CDCR Division of Rehabilitative Programs Director. “Giving these offenders the tools they need to be successful in their own rehabilitation both inside and outside prison is imperative.”

The program is intended to serve inmates who have been identified as having moderate to high risk of criminal behavior and are serving indeterminate sentences with the possibility of parole.

The LTOPP is a voluntary program which will include evidence-based treatment for:
• Substance abuse
• Criminal thinking
• Victim impact
• Anger-management issues
• Improvement of family relationships

The LTOPP will initially be implemented at the following institutions: California State Prison, Solano in Vacaville; Central California Women’s Facility in Chowchilla; and California Men’s Colony in San Luis Obispo. Inmates who are serving indeterminate sentences at non-pilot institutions may be allowed to temporarily transfer to a pilot location in order to participate in the LTOPP.

Additionally, CDCR is creating Long-Term Offender Reentry Facilities that will help long-term offenders during their transition back into society, including housing, employment and community-based services. Locations for these reentry facilities are still being determined.

The pilot program will be in effect for 24 months, during which the CDCR Division of Rehabilitative Programs will monitor implementation and effectiveness of the program. If proven to be a successful rehabilitative tool, the program will then go through the Administrative Procedures Act process to become a formal policy.

The LTOPP is being implemented in accordance with the 2012 CDCR Blueprint in which the department was tasked with increasing the percentage of inmates served in rehabilitative programs prior to release to 70 percent of the target population.

Meet Millicent Tidwell

Millicent Tidwell, 52, of Sacramento, was appointed director of the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation Division of Rehabilitative Programs, where she has served as acting director since 2013.

Tidwell held multiple positions at the California Department of Alcohol and Drug Programs from 2005 to 2013, including acting deputy director of the Licensing and Certification Division and deputy director of the Office of Criminal Justice Collaboration.

Millicent Tidwell, Director, Division of Rainbows and Unicorns

Millicent Tidwell, Director, Division of Rehabilitative Programs.  Paco wishes to thank Ms. Tidwell’s office for graciously providing this photo of her recently unveiled, state-commissioned portrait.
 

She served as chief of the California Department of Corrections Mentally Ill Offender Services from 2000 to 2005 and was a public safety policy analyst in the Office of Governor Gray Davis from 1999 to 2000.

Tidwell was an attorney in private practice from 1997 to 1999. She earned a Juris Doctor degree from the Lincoln Law School of Sacramento. This position requires Senate confirmation and the compensation is $140,292.

Tidwell is a Democrat. (Source: Jerry Brown)

Paco is all for providing meaningful programs to all inmates willing and able to make proper use of the training provided. Having said that, I am curious about a few things.

First, why did Ms. Tidwell make that grand, obvious, statement about how people spending life in prison are out of touch with the latest tech trends while, in contrast, the article lists only “evidence based treatment” for “Substance abuse, Criminal thinking, Victim impact, Anger-management issues and Improvement of family relationships?” What do these ‘programs’ have to do with techno-retardation?

Will CDCR be employing some new technologies to “treat” volunteers in the pilot program? Some kind of mind beams or the like?

Was she even talking about LTOPP or was she brushing the hair on her my little pony doll and gazing off toward the horizon? YIKES!

This leads me to question whether this sudden emphasis on preparing lifers for the outside world is another realignment ruse. After all, they are described in the preceding article in terms oddly similar to those employed during the AB109, 3N Okee-doke.

I mean, what’s the difference between “having moderate to high risk of criminal behavior” and being “non-violent, non-serious…?”

Look for renewed pressure at the Board of Parole Hearings to grant more dates which the Governor will allow…provided there isn’t a big stink about this case or that.

A lot of lifers can be found to be “cured” in 2 years–Plenty enough to satisfy 3 activist jurists.  -

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8 Comments to “Teach your Lifers well? (This is NOT a parody!)”

  1. Phyllis Loya says:

    I am sure a lot of them know more about how to use cell phones than I do since they have had time to master all the fine points of their smuggled in cell phones, and one only has to look at their facebook pages to know they are already adept at social media skills. Victim Impact soon to be led by those hug-a-thugs reconciliation “victims”. All this fits very nicely into the ACLU folks and their ilk’s agenda to do away with death penalty, lwop, lengthy sentences, etc and let’s not forget the “kids” program where all the murderers in their 30’s and 40’s can whine about how they were mere youth when then they went on their killing sprees and deserve second, third, fourth and fifth chances. Do I sound bitter? Absolutely, and I get even more bitter when I see my son’s death row killer on a prison pen pal site and his picture shows him grinning ear to ear in a S.Q. visiting room as he promises to be your good friend if you write him because he is such a kind-hearted individual., Will this insanity ever stop???

    • Richard Krupp says:

      I’m sorry to hear that the actions of California politicians and federal judges has created this pain for you. Unfortunately the pro-crime group lead by senator Darrell Stienberg, judges Henderson, Karlton, and company has portrayed violent criminals as people suffering from some undefined condition that can be cured with nonsensical “treatment”. There appears to be no end in sight.

  2. FXSTC1 says:

    Teach a lifer how to build a fence and he will have a trade for life. Teach a lifer how to climb a fence and he will never need a trade or anything else. Same goes for the tunnel digging trade.

  3. kl2008a says:

    There has been a lot of technical changes in the automobile industry over the past 20 years. So are we required to teach a criminal how to use the cruise control or On-Star capabilities of the next vehicle he or she will steal upon release?

  4. Bob Walsh says:

    Which one is Tidwell?